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Services2018-11-01T09:51:05+00:00

Mental Health services can be divided into two general categories: services to people experiencing temporary, stage of life problems and services to those who suffer chronic, life-long mental illnesses.

Development of a treatment plan to address each individual’s needs is important and may consist of any of the following interventions:

  • Individual or Group Therapy
  • Couples or Family Counseling
  • Children’s Services – Theraputic Foster Care and Home-based Services
  • Case Management – Supported Employment and Medication Management

Hot Springs County Counseling Services provides outpatient substance abuse services. These services consist of:

  • Individual and Group Therapies
  • Substance Abuse Evaluations
  • Consultation and Referral to In-Patient Facilities
  • Clinical Assessments

An intensive outpatient addiction program (IOP) provides people with the freedom to live at home and still attend work or school while receiving addiction services. IOP is used as a primary type of care or utilized after completing an inpatient program to continue to build on coping skills and decrease the risk of relapse.

Our program consists of group sessions 3 days a week, for 3 hours each day, as well as a weekly individual counseling session.

Equine Therapy (also referred to as Horse Therapy, Equine-Assisted Therapy, and Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy) is a form of experiential therapy that involves interactions between patients and horses.

Equine Therapy involves activities (such as grooming, feeding, haltering and leading a horse) that are supervised by a mental health professional, often with the support of a horse professional.

The goal of equine therapy is to help the patient develop needed skills and attributes, such as accountability, responsibility, self-confidence, problem-solving skills, and self-control. Equine therapy also provides an innovative milieu in which the therapist and the patient can identify and address a range of emotional and behavioral challenges.

What are the Benefits of Equine Therapy?

Studies have indicated that equine therapy has been successful in helping patients show marked improvements in the following areas:

  • Assertiveness
  • Emotional awareness
  • Empathy
  • Stress tolerance
  • Flexibility
  • Impulse control
  • Problem-solving skills
  • Self-actualization
  • Independence
  • Self-regard
  • Social responsibility
  • Interpersonal relationships

Many of the benefits of equine therapy are likely due to the nature of the animals with which the patient and equine therapist are interacting. Horses are typically non-judgmental, have no preconceived expectations or motives, and are highly effective at mirroring attitudes and behaviors of the humans with whom they are working.

While working with horses under the guidance and supervision of an equine therapist, equine therapy patients have a unique and effective opportunity to note their tendency to engage in self-defeating and otherwise negative thoughts and actions. These realizations provide excellent bases for discussion and processing both during and after the equine therapy experience.

What Conditions/Disorders Does Equine Therapy Treat?

Equine therapy has been successfully integrated into treatment programs for adults and teens who are being treated for substance abuse, addiction, behavior disorders, mood disorders, eating disorders, learning differences, ADD/ADHD, autism, Asperger’s, grief/loss, trauma, sex addiction, compulsive gambling, bipolar, depression and related conditions.

Anger Rehabilitation Group or ARG is a Cognitive Behavioral Approach that employs relaxation, congitive, and communication skills interventions. This combined approach presents the participants with options that draw on these different interventions and then encourages them to develop individualized anger control plans using as many of the techniques as possible.

Not all the participants use all the techniques and interventions presented in the treatment (i.e., cognitive restructuring), but almost all finsih the treatment with more than one technique or intervention on their anger control plans.

Theoretically, the more techniques and interventions an individual has on his or her anger control plan, the better equipped he or she will be able to manage anger in response to anger-provoking events.

The treatment model is flexible and can accommodate racial, cultural, and gender issues.

A person still has to identify the triggering event, recognize the cues to anger, and develop anger management (cognitive behavioral) strategies in response to the event and sues, regardless of whether these events and causes are different from other men and women or for people in other cultural groups.

Whether court-ordered or an individual wanting help with anger problems, this group addresses those needs.

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a psychotherapy developed by Francine Shapiro in the 1980’s to address disturbing memories and trauma. EMDR can alleviate the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and has been used effectively where other therapies have failed.

The therapy uses an eight-step protocol that includes the recall of distressing images while performing with the help of the therapist bilateral sensory movements including side to side eye movements. The methods can be used to address many other conditions besides trauma in both adults and children.

Theraplay is a child and family attachment therapy whose goal is to improve the attachment process between a child and their caregivers. The principals underlying Theraplay are that healthy attachment between a child and the primary adult caregiver is necessary in neurological development and thus the basis for healthy emotional and social development.

The process of Theraplay is quite different for traditional play therapy. In traditional play therapy the child is let to take the lead in expressing himself through play. Theraplay is therapist directed and the activities are determined by the therapist.

Parents or significant others are included from the beginning in the therapy and are looked at as co-therapists in the process. They watch the process at first and gradually join in and take over the simple games. The therapy is not about the games, however, and is not a cognitive learning process as much as it is a ‘felt’ process very much like what an infant and their mother experience.

Direct contact with an enrolled or unenrolled person in crisis as an intervention to prevent escalation of the crisis and to triage the person into needed services.

Consultation services are case-centered or program-centered services rendered to other human service agencies, healthcare professionals, or human service oriented groups in order to assist them in meeting the mental health needs of their constituents who are NOT clients of the mental health center. Consultation does not involve treatment of individuals or groups in lieu of enrolling such persons as clients of the mental health centers.

A community based service where master or doctoral level licensed therapists with specialized traiing or experience in providing therapeutic services to children provide services to preschool-age children and their families who are experiencing or are at risk of behavioral, mental, or alcohol or substance abuse disorders.

Therapists must have received training in the treatment of trauma in young children. Early intervention staff must assist in the identification of children needing this service. The therapist must collaborate with EPSDT screeners, Public Health Nurses, DFS staff and staff of early childhood agencies such as Head Start, Early Childhood Centers, preschools, daycare centers, and Boys and Girls Clubs.

Outreach services are face-to-face or telephone contacts with an agency, an individual or a family for the purpose of screening for service need and/or engaging the potential client in mental health treatment.

Skill trainer contact with the enrolled client and collaterals as necessary for the purpose of implementing that portion of the enrolled client’s treatment plan targeted to developing and restoring basic skills necessary to function independently in the home and the community in an age-appropriate manner and for the purpose of developing or re-developing those skills necessary to enable and maintain independent living in the community in an age-appropriate manner, including learning skills in use of necessary community resources. Services provided to family members must be for the direct benefit of the enrolled client.

Education/Prevention services are designed to increase the level of mental health knowledge or skills of the lay public or specialized groups of individuals.

Education/Prevention services may consist of providing mental health information to the general public, skill training, conducting workshops, seminars, or similar experiences. It does not include staff development or continuing educational experiences for the agency’s own staff, political activities designed to influence voters on mental health issues, or activities which are primarily fund raising in nature.

Medication management services at Hot Springs County Counseling involves the prescription of psychotropic medications. This is a medical service that is provided by a Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner who is Board Certified and licensed to prescribe prescription medications to patients of all ages. The service involves treatment of both acute and chronic psychiatric and mental health conditions.

Examples include depressive disorders, mood disorders, psychotic disorders, disorders of childhood such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, and substance abuse disorders.

This service also involves extensive counseling about medications and education on disease processes and prevention management.

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Wellspring is a private, non-profit organization. Your contributions help us to continue providing the highest level of care to those in need in our community.

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